Ask The Sourcing Dude and Dudette

12 05 2009

sourcingdudette

We’ve enlisted the help of the Master Sourcers themselves, The Sourcing Dude and the Sourcing Dudette, to answer some questions that are at the forefront of many of our minds. In each issue of The Source, they will respond to some of these questions.

If you have a pressing issue you’d like the Sourcing Dude and Dudette to answer, please email us and we will bring it to the SourceCon shrine for consideration.

“There are people in the sourcing world who are on both sides of the fence when it comes to social media. Some think they are great resources, others think they’re just a time suck. What are your thoughts on engaging in community using social media from a sourcing standpoint? Is it worth your time, or should we be spending our time elsewhere, such as Googling or searching resume banks?”

Since we all agree that Recruiting is akin to sales and marketing, the leveraging of social media has to be seriously considered as part of a company’s strategy. Not so much for pure sourcing, but rather, as part of a bigger strategy that a company needs around leveraging these solutions to help create brand awareness and mutually meaningful relationships with candidates.

Gone are the days of slick marketing that tries to give the impression that the company is perfect. Candidates in this day and age expect more transparency from an organization on what it is actually like to work for a company and do the companies values, opportunities and goals effectively marry up with the interests of the candidate.

Social media should be used as a vehicle to reach a targeted audience through both push and pull marketing that feeds up relevant and added value information to potentially interested candidates and acts as part of the conduit to help establish and develop candidate relationships.

In the future I believe these social communities will become better defined, more relevant and targeted to the needs of the demographics which will provide the Sourcer/Recruiter the ability to connect with potential candidates that have mutual interest with what a company has to offer. Do I think that social media and social networking sites will become the greatest source of hires in the next few years, No. Do I think that if a company correctly leverages social media and looks to establish targeted and relevant communities that build relationships based on mutual interest ahead of demand, could they one day become the greatest source of hires, Yes.

But in reality, until companies and recruiters understand that social media should be a vehicle to help promote brand awareness and create relevant and targeted relationships with future-interest candidates vs. thinking they are next big thing from which to source candidates, then I do not believe social media is the savior of us all.

 

Make sure you follow the Sourcing Dude (and Dudette!) on Twitter as well: @SourceConDude

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Ask The Sourcing Dude and Dudette

13 04 2009

sourcingdudette

We’ve enlisted the help of the Master Sourcers themselves, The Sourcing Dude and the Sourcing Dudette, to answer some questions that are at the forefront of many of our minds. In each issue of The Source, they will respond to some of these questions.

If you have a pressing issue you’d like the Sourcing Dude and Dudette to answer, please email us and we will bring it to the SourceCon shrine for consideration.

“I keep hearing about Twitter, but what’s the best way for me to use it as a sourcing professional?”

Twitter is one of these new social media communication tools. It is important to remember that it is merely a communication medium and not a strategy in and of itself. It should be incorporated into your already established recruitment strategy, whatever that may be. The biggest keys to being successful in using Twitter, no matter how you choose to use it, are listening and engagement. There are several different approaches you can take to using Twitter:

Some sourcers choose to use Twitter as a learning medium. By choosing to use Twitter to learn from others, it is best to do research to find the movers and shakers in the sourcing community on Twitter, and start following them. Once you start following your sourcing colleagues, engage them in conversation. Listen FIRST, then add to the conversation. The more you listen, the more you will learn.

If you choose to use Twitter as a tool with which to find potential candidates, you’ll need to do specific keyword searches in order to find your target audience. I don’t recommend immediately bombarding your target audience with all the positions for which you are sourcing that you think they’d be perfect for. This will turn them off to making a true connection with you. Like with your recruiting connections, engage them in conversation. Listen to what their interests are, help them out by answering some questions, and develop relationships. The better your relationships with your potential candidates, the more likely they will be to either discuss your open positions or recommend some colleagues.

Finally, if you are considering using Twitter from a business development standpoint, make sure you maintain a balance between promoting your company and being real. If all you do is promote, promote, promote, you will most likely turn people off. Provide added value to your audience, and once again, engage in real conversation. Your audience wants to know that there is a real human being behind that Twitter account. Know you are real will make them more likely to do business with you.

 

 

Make sure you follow the Sourcing Dude (and Dudette!) on Twitter as well: @SourceConDude





Ask the Sourcing Dude and Dudette

12 01 2009

sourcingdudette

We’ve enlisted the help of the Master Sourcers themselves, The Sourcing Dude and the Sourcing Dudette, to answer some questions that are at the forefront of many of our minds. In each issue of The Source, they will respond to some of these questions.

If you have a pressing issue you’d like the Sourcing Dude and Dudette to answer, please email us and we will bring it to the SourceCon shrine for consideration.

The Sourcing Dudette will be fielding this month’s inquiry:

“I am interested in working as a contract sourcer. What are some of the steps I need to take in order to begin this process, and what are some things you would recommend to be successful in such an endeavor?”

The initial steps would be to:

  1. Have two resumes, one that focuses on sourcing experience and one that focuses on recruiting experience.   If your resume reads all full life-cycle recruiting, then it is unlikely that you will be the top on the list for sourcing opportunities.  Most sourcers come from FLC recruiting backgrounds (or agency recruiting) and have transitioned well into sourcing roles.
  2. Get yourself registered with any of the local or national staffing agencies that may be dedicated to placing sourcers and recruiters.  
  3. Set up  a  profile on all of the relevant social networks.   Get connected with other Sourcers to share ideas and information.
  4. Sign up for all of the Yahoo! and LinkedIn groups that are specific to sourcing and research, candidate development, passive pipelines, etc.
  5. Meet with your financial advisor or tax accountant to find out your options for contract status (ie. 1099, W2, Corp-to-Corp).   Depending on your home state, home office expenses, tax bracket, income, etc. – it could make a huge difference in your taxable income.
  6. Be aware of ALL of the great resources available to the Sourcing Community for continuing education:   webinars (free and paid), local and national conferences, social networking groups, learning websites, etc.  
  7. Stay (or get) current and familiar with all of the sourcing-specific technologies that are prevalent in today’s market .

 

Make sure you follow the Sourcing Dude (and Dudette!) on Twitter as well: @SourceConDude





Ask the Sourcing Dude

8 12 2008

We’ve enlisted the help of the Master Sourcer himself, The Sourcing Dude, to answer some questions that are at the forefront of many of our minds. In each issue of The Source, The Sourcing Dude will respond to some of these questions.

If you have a pressing issue you’d like the Sourcing Dude to answer, please email us and we will bring it to the SourceCon shrine for consideration.

BIG NEWS: over the fall, the Sourcing Dude got hitched! His new bride, known to us only as the Sourcing Dudette, has been described by the Sourcing Dude as ‘the last remaining piece of the puzzle’ for him. Apparently she is also a whiz at research and sourcing, which is what captivated the Sourcing Dude so much. She has agreed to step in and respond to this month’s question. Please give a warm welcome to the Sourcing Dudette!

“Sourcing Dude, what are your thoughts on some of the new social media tools with regards to sourcing? Do you think it’s worth your time to use a resource like Twitter for doing internet research and finding candidates?”

sourcingdudetteAs many new social media tools have become available, it is tempting to want to jump on the bandwagon and do what everyone else is doing by using these resources in your recruiting practice. However, I will caution you against using anything and everything. Each company, team, office, etc. will find that different resources will be of use to them. Choosing to implement the use of a resource simply because “everyone else is doing it” is wrong because your needs will be different from other teams’ needs. My husband, the Sourcing Dude, would suggest that you evaluate new tools as they become available. Take them for a test run, see if they produce any value, and if they don’t, don’t be afraid to discard or set them aside for later use. What works for one team may not work for another. Don’t be afraid to select only one or two social media tools to throw into the mix of your sourcing strategy as well; sometimes less is more.

I definitely think that social media tools such as Twitter can POTENTIALLY be helpful in assisting your sourcing efforts. Make sure you use them wisely – come up with a plan of attack, decide how you want to use the resource before you dive head-first into it, and stick to your plan. Make sure you see it through to completion once you have decided to add a strategy to your sourcing arsenal. And above all – stay focused. It is very easy to get off-course when using social media tools for recruiting purposes!

Make sure you follow the Sourcing Dude (and Dudette!) on Twitter as well: @SourceConDude





Ask The Sourcing Dude

12 11 2008

We’ve enlisted the help of the Master Sourcer himself, The Sourcing Dude, to answer some questions that are at the forefront of many of our minds. In each issue of The Source, The Sourcing Dude will respond to some of these questions.

If you have a pressing issue you’d like the Sourcing Dude to answer, please email us and we will bring it to the SourceCon shrine for consideration.

With the economy the way it is now, how do you think the sourcing function will be affected within corporations? Is now a good time to consider becoming a contractor, or do you think sourcing will stand through this test? Do you have any advice for sourcers to follow during rough economic times?

These are great opportunities to focus on the building of pipelines, identifying and development passive candidates for future openings.   It is also a great opportunity to build out your sourcing strategy within your organization, and bring in additional training to re-tool your recruiting staff on various sourcing methods.  Under normal conditions, there never seems to be enough time for on-site training, webinars, conferences, etc. without impacting production.   So seize the opportunity to provide your teams with whatever training they need to become strong sourcers or to implement a sourcing strategy.

 A short-list of some things to consider would include:

  • Participate in sourcing webinars as individuals or groups
  • On-site training for the entire team in areas of sourcing and productivity
  • Attend industry conferences – SourceCon, ERE, Kennedy
  • Look into your options for implementing a CRM tool to track passive candidates
  • Implementing a new ATS
  • Look at your outbound channel grid for sourcing passive candidates – are you getting the optimum results from each channel?
  • Put more time and effort into developing your passive candidate talent pools – proactive outreach, community development, special projects, etc.
  • Do you have good metrics for your sourcing?   It is a good time to take advantage of a hiring “pause” and look at the metrics and results from the last 3 -6 – 12 months

If you are currently in a full time position, I would hang in there until the storm blows over. The market for contract sourcers is getting tighter every day as the layoffs have flooded the market with some outstanding talent.